Ingrid Ulrich’s Greenland SUP odyssey

Through one of the world’s most hostile and wildest environment, Ingrid Ulrich paddled hundreds of kilometres solo for over 20 days.

Ingrid Ulrich’s Greenland SUP odyssey

Ingrid’s expedition was to SUP in the middle of Baffin Bay, which is isolated for the most part of the year by the polar stream glaciers that come straight down from the icy Arctic Ocean, until they end up turning into ice floe.

It is through one of the world’s most hostile and wildest environments where Ingrid paddled hundreds of kilometres solo for over 20 days. She lived a unique adventure paddling within gigantic icebergs, glaciers, whales, whilst meeting people living in remote, isolated Inuit communities.

She started her trip on the west coast of Greenland, 250km north of the Arctic Circle at the very bottom of Sermar Kujalleq, known for being one of the most active glaciers in the world. She then headed north to reach the cabin where the renowned scientist Paul Emile Victor undertook his first French polar expeditions, sometimes having to push huge unmelted chunks of ice out of her path.

It was a true expedition that she committed herself to, in a beautiful and incredible environment but one where vicious cold and hostility exist.

Ingrid’s expeditions and sport challenges are for most of us a source of encouragement and inspiration, as well as a good lesson in courage and determination. Her guideline is to simply make you dare and to make your dreams come true.

About thepaddlerezine (372 Articles)
Editor of The Paddler magazine and Publisher of Stand Up Paddle Mag UK and Windsurfing UK magazines

1 Comment on Ingrid Ulrich’s Greenland SUP odyssey

  1. What a lovely article! I have great admiration for those well-prepared paddlers who have the mental tenacity and physical stamina to undertake these sorts of expeditions. That’s a very tough environment. Once the deed is done, some look at it as a fait accompli, like of course it was going to succeed. But until she was safely out of there, the outcome was always in doubt and her life was on the line with Mother Nature. It takes fire in the belly to get out of your little tent and set off -alone- in the morning, striving to reach your goal. Kudos to her and also to your publication for helping to share her story with the paddling community.
    Moulton Avery

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